888-741-9156

Bob Westbrook,

Your Guide to

Long-Term Care

Bob Westbrook,

Your Guide to

Long-Term Care

Contact Bob

Do You Qualify For LTC Insurance?

LTC Bob

Certified Long-Term Care Specialist

Most of us believe we’re going to live a long life and in doing so, we may become frail. What we don’t take in to consideration are the severe consequences that becoming frail will have on the emotional, physical, and financial well being of our loved ones. Navigating long-term care insurance can be overwhelming and confusing. This is especially true for those who put off finding the proper plan until the last minute.

Bob Westbrook is a certified long-term care specialist that helps educate consumers and prospective clients about the impact of not planning for living a long life and becoming frail can have. Like:

  • Who will supervise the care?
  • Who will provide the care?
  • Where will it be provided?
  • Who will pay for it?

Bob invites you to utilize his skills as a long-term care specialist and have him help you design a specific plan for you to help mitigate those consequences for your loved ones.

long-term care specialist

The Most Common LTC Questions

What is long-term care? How much does it cost?
Long-term care refers to services intended to assist individuals in need of medical and non-medical care over an extended period of time. Long-term care services may include assistance with activities of daily living, home health care, respite care, hospice care, adult day care, care in a nursing home, or care in an assisted living facility. Long-term care is different from traditional medical care in that it helps one live as he or she is now and may not help to improve or correct medical problems. The cost of long-term care services can vary greatly based on the type of care needed and where the care is received. In 2017, the average median annual rate of nursing home care in the United States was $85,775 per year. The cost of an assisted living facility was $45,000 per year and adult day health care exceeded $18,000 per year.
Will health insurance pay for long-term care?
Many people think that their health insurance will pay for long-term care expenses. Unfortunately, long-term care is generally not considered medical care and typically health insurance plans will not pay for long-term care expenses.
Will Medicare or Medicaid pay for long-term care?
Medicare does not cover most nursing home care and will only pay the cost of some skilled care in an approved nursing home or in your home in specific situations. Medicaid will pay for nursing home care only for individuals who are low-income and who have few assets. It will only pay for some home- and community-based services. To get help from Medicaid, you must meet federal and state guidelines for income and assets. In order to qualify, many people start paying for care out of their own funds and reduce their income and assets until they are eligible for benefits. Medicaid may then pay part or all of their nursing home costs, but their personal resources have been depleted, leaving little for other expenses.
Will disability insurance pay for long-term care?
Disability insurance was not designed to pay for long-term care. Its purpose is to replace lost income due to a disabling illness or injury while you are actively employed. In addition, disability insurance coverage typically ends at age 65 or upon retirement, whichever occurs first.
Can I pay for long-term care myself?
Yes. An individual can pay for the cost of long-term care from their personal funds. However, many individuals underestimate the cost of long-term care. In a scenario where one spouse requires long-term care and the other does not, use of personal or retirement funds may have a negative financial impact on the spouse not requiring care. Some people resort to selling assets, such as their homes, to pay for their long-term care needs.
Where are long-term care services provided?
Long-term care services are generally thought of as occurring in a nursing home, but most people prefer to receive care outside of a nursing home when possible. Long-term care can be performed in an individual’s residence, assisted living or residential care facility, nursing home, or a community based adult day care center. A long-term care specialist can help you sort through your options.

Chance of Becoming Disabled
or Impaired After Age 65

%

Women

%

Men

%

of individuals over age 65 will require some type of LTC during their lifetime.

%

of individuals currently receiving long-term care are over age 64.

Contact Bob

888-741-9156

Send an email.

4481 Ash Grove
Springfield, IL 62711

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